The road to Cue

Leaving Yalgoo we headed north-east along a back road to Cue, from memory about 160km. It was good gravel and clay all the way. Along this stretch of road there were some interesting old mine sites and an abandoned homestead and woolshed complex. It was surrounded by an amazing carpet of violet wildflowers. Homealone also spotted what we think is young kite sitting in a dead tree beside the road.  It kept a keen eye on me as I tried to creep closer, eventually flying off in a rush of feathers to safer places.

We think this is a young Kite?

We think this is a young Kite?

The road north-east to Cue.

The road north-east to Cue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A special place down a side track is a small meteorite crater discovered in 1920. It is apparently the smallest authenticated site in the world and is about 20 metres across and 5 metres deep; comparatively young at about 3,000 years. The meteorite people believe it was made of an unusual rock type  and because of its small size would have buried itself on impact then exploding, creating the crater. Quite a sight no doubt to the local indigenous people at the time.

The meteorite crater.

The meteorite crater.

Abandoned homestead and woolshed.

Abandoned homestead and woolshed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closer to Cue we come to Walga Rock. This is the second largest monolith in Australia after Uluru. It is a place of special significance to the aboriginal people of the area. A large cave has a series of fairly weathered  paintings. There is also a sailing ship outline on the rock wall that seems of much newer vintage. There is debate about who has painted it. It could be that it is not in fact aboriginal in origin but done by an early settler. There appears to be some lines of scraggly  writing underneath it, maybe arabic. Perhaps an early Afghan  camelier  has left a mark!

 

At Walga Rock talking to something that doesn't answer back.

At Walga Rock talking to something that doesn’t answer back.

The ship at Walga Rock

The ship at Walga Rock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The wildflowers surrounding us on the roadside continue to amaze in their diversity. Wattles in full bloom are every where, with splashes of everlastings and other ground cover type species. We have been able to identify a few of the more common ones from our small guide books.

A grevillea of some sort?

A grevillea of some sort?

Carpet of flowers.

Carpet of flowers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We arrived in Cue late afternoon to settle into the very comfortable Council run Cue camp ground for a couple of nights. Cue is midway between Mt Magnet in the south and Meekatharra in the north. The delights of Cue need to await the next blog!

About allthegobro

I am a retired accountant who does a bit of consulting work from time to time. Leanne and I enjoy travelling around seeing the world and we are now going to have some fun recording our experiences in this blog

Posted on September 4, 2016, in Western Australia 2016. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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